(09/06/2020)
Four men, including three from Gilmer County, in separate cases Thursday were sentenced on drug charges in U.S. District Court in Clarksburg.

Waitman Larry Frederick, 43, of Glenville, also known as Cornbread, was sentenced to 168 months of incarceration for his role in a drug distribution operation by Judge Irene M. Keeley, U.S. Attorney Bill Powell said.

Frederick in November 2019 pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, aiding and abetting possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, aiding and abetting maintaining drug-involved premises and unlawful possession of a firearm, Powell said.

Frederick admitted to working with others to distribute large quantities of crystal methamphetamine, also known as “ice,” from July 2018 to November 2018 in Gilmer County and elsewhere, Powell said. Frederick also admitted to operating a residence at 18 East Main St., Apartment C, in Glenville for the purpose of distributing the drug. He also was illegally in possession of 10 firearms, Powell said.

Keeley sentenced Chet Atkins Massey, 51, of Sand Fork, to six months of incarceration to be followed by six months of home detention for his involvement in a methamphetamine distribution operation, Powell said.

Massey pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting distribution of methamphetamine in proximity to a protected location in September 2019, Powell said. Massey admitted to selling methamphetamine near Gilmer County High School in September 2018, Powell said.

Jeremiah Lee Carr, 33, of Glenville, was sentenced by Keeley to six months of incarceration to be followed by six months of home detention for his involvement in a methamphetamine distribution operation, Powell said.

Carr pleaded guilty in August 2019 to aiding and abetting distribution of methamphetamine in proximity to a protected location in August 2019. Carr admitted to selling methamphetamine near Glenville State College in September 2018.

Michael Anthony Hill Jr., 25, of Columbus, was sentenced Thursday to 57 months in prison by Keeley for his role in a drug distribution operation, Powell said.

Hill, also known as Big Mike, pleaded guilty to possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine in January and admitted to distributing more than 50 grams of methamphetamine, also known as “crystal” and “ice,” in November 2018 in Gilmer County, Powell said.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Brandon S. Flower prosecuted the cases on behalf of the government. The investigations were led by the Mountain Regional Drug and Violent Crimes Task Force and the Mountain Lakes Drug and Violent Crimes Task Force.

In another case, Anthony A. Shuster Jr., 35, and Amy S. Lambert-Shuster, both of Caldwell, admitted Thursday to drug and firearms charges, Powell said.

Anthony Shuster, also known as Tiny, pleaded guilty to distribution of more than 50 grams of methamphetamine. Shuster admitted to selling more than 50 grams of methamphetamine, also known as “crystal meth” and “ice,” in January 2019 in Ritchie County.

Amy Lambert-Shuster, 41, pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting the unlawful transfer of a machine gun. She admitted to transferring an AR15-type firearm in January 2019 in Ritchie County.

Shuster faces at least 10 years and up to life incarceration and a fine of up to $10 million, Powell said. Lambert-Shuster faces up to 10 years of incarceration and a fine of up to $250,000.

Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed will be based upon the seriousness of the offenses and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen L. Vogrin is prosecuting the case. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives investigated.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael John Aloi presided.


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