(03/18/2020)
By Bob Weaver

It all comes down to us, sooner or later in the backwoods of West Virginia, where people have better than average survival skills.

A pandemic is here, with it's wacky problems, in addition of a predicted recession.

The bottom line, with America's polarized politics, is about our families and friends.

In Calhoun, despite differences, we have had the cultural ability to care about others, lend then a hand, even with those differences.

It has been, and continues to be a hallmark of character in these hills.

As the stress of the Coronavirus is upon us, perhaps we need to lean on those closer to us to get better information, rather than polarized cable news and social media.

I went to Spencer's Walmart to discover the large retailer had run out of toilet paper, paper towels, and napkins, and many of the shelves were bare of stock foods.

There was a bevy of shoppers, the most I've seen in a long time, long lines and long waits.

A Walmart employ jokingly said, "It might be be a good time to open a food store," although there were lots of food items on the shelves.

There was a verbal argument over buying water, which was in short supply.

It was 10 times worse than when people rush the stores over a winter storm.

I was reminded how fear drives the human race.

I then ran into a woman from Roane County who had come to Arnoldsburg to buy some toilet paper, while I had a flat tire.

Granted, we seem to be living in a country that has been ill-prepared and at times in denial of the impact this pandemic could have on our lives. There seems to have been little initiative in planning ahead for testing.

We must believe we will get through this problem as money markets falter, supply chains disrupted, politicians battling it out and a recession is upon us.

Unlike other pandemics, this one may be a real test about our future.

Here, in our little place in the world, we are hopeful people will keep up to speed about the problem and the solutions. We're trying to use the better sources to publish on the Hur Herald.

And in case you forgot how, maybe a few more kind words to our neighbors and those we meet everyday would help. They don't do that much in New York City.

May the higher power of our understanding be with us through a troubling time.

This too shall pass.


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